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Wednesday, May 20, 2020 | History

3 edition of Amending an act for division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma. found in the catalog.

Amending an act for division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma.

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian Affairs

Amending an act for division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma.

by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian Affairs

  • 36 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by [s.n.] in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of North America -- Land tenure,
  • Tribal trust funds,
  • Osage Indians

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesAmending law for division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma
    SeriesH.rp.243
    The Physical Object
    FormatElectronic resource
    Pagination2 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16142413M

    Indian Title Chart: Lands Allotted Under the General Allotment Act Notes to Accompany Table of Alienability Among General Allotment Indians Withington, W.R., Land Titles in Oklahoma Under the General Allotment Act, 30 Oklahoma Bar Association Journal (). § 2: The oil, gas, coal and/or other minerals within the boundaries of the Osage Reservation are hereby reserved to the Osage Nation pursuant to the Act of June 5, , (34 Stat. ), as amended, and is hereby designated the Osage Mineral Estate.

    2. The treaties and statutes governing the lands of the Osage Nation; and 3. The General Allotment Act which applies to all other tribes. 4. The general theme of Oklahoma Indian titles is that the federal government imposed restrictions on alienation of Indian lands to pro-tect the Indian allottees. The legal basis for the federal government'sAuthor: D. Faith Orlowski, Robbie Emery Burke. of Indians, J , 14 Stat. ; and (3) the Act of June 5, , ch. , 17 Stat. (An Act to Confirm to the Great and Little Osage Indians a Reservation in the Indian Territory), and all other lands under federally-restricted status title to which is held by the Nation or theFile Size: 1MB.

    Committee on Indian Affairs: Ute Indians, amending jurisdictional act; restoration of lands; authorizing suits in Court of Claims for claims of certain Indians, etc. Hearings, Seventy-sixth Congress, third session, on H. R. , an act to make more effective use of certain parts of the public domain, and for other purposes. August , the Osage trust funds pursuant to Section 4 of the Act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes, 34 Stat. (J ) (hereinafter the “ Act”), and pursuant to other law.


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Amending an act for division of lands and funds of Osage Indians in Oklahoma by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian Affairs Download PDF EPUB FB2

PUBLIC LAW —OCT. 30, 98 STAT. Public Law 98th Congress An Act. To make certain technical corrections in various Acts relating to the Osage Tribe of Indians of OklsQioma.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SHORT TITLE SECTION1. An Act Amending an Act entitled "An Act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma, and for other purposes," approved Jand Acts amendatory thereof and supplemental thereto.

For the division of lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes’’, approved J (34 Stat. ), means the persons eligible for allot-ments of Osage Reservation lands and a pro rata share of the Osage mineral estate as provided in that Act, not member-ship in the Osage Tribe for all purposes.

CHAP. An Act For the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and IIouse of Representatives of tte United States of America in Congress assernbled, That the roll of the Osage tribe of Indians, as shown by the records of the United States in the.

"(5) the term 'Osage Tribe Allotment Act' means the Act approved Jand entitled 'An Act For the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes.' (34 Stat.

scribes these allotments in his book, Oklahoma Indian Land Titles (see Appendix B). The allotments were accompanied by restrictions as to alienability which evolved over a period of time as numerous acts were adopted amending the restrictions.

The justification for the restricted Indian ownership of land was to allow the Indians time to adapt to aFile Size: KB. OF LANDS ALLOTTED AMONG THE OSAGE INDIANS There are sever al features in the Osage allotments under the Act of J34 Stat.that are unique to them.

In the first place, all of the land in the reservation was allotted. There were three rounds in each of which each allottee selected acres. Following that, the.

In Congress forced the Osages to sell their lands in Kansas and buy lands from the Cherokees in what was then Oklahoma Territory. The price quoted was 25 cents an acre. When the Osages hove into sight, of course, the Cherokees upped the price to 70 cents an acre.

It was a seller's market.4/4(5). InCongress passed the Osage Allotment Act in an attempt to individualize much of the Osage tribal property and to provide some protection for tribal members. See Act of Jch.34 Stat. (An Act for the Division of the Lands and Funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory and for Other Purposes) (the “ Act”).

ONCAAn Act to amend§ of Title 15 to require the Treasurer to report the total amount of unassigned revenues and unobligated funds to the Osage Nation Congress; to require the total to be distributed to the Economic Development Fund, the Retained Revenue Fund and the Permanent Fund; and to establish an alternate effective date.

Inthe United States Congress created a trust fund in Section 4 of the Act for the Division of the Lands and Funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory and for Other Purposes, 34 Stat.

(J ) (hereinafter, the " Act"). Real Estate Services The Osage Nation Real Estate Services Department provides management and oversite on approximatelyacres of individually and tribally owned restricted and trust lands.

The Department offers farming and grazing lease management of individual and tribally owned properties. Oklahoma Indian land titles, annotated. Semple. 32 Stat acres Act of April Act of August act of Congress Act of January Act of June allotted lands allottee apply approval April 12 April 26 Arkansas authorized Cherokee Nation Chickasaw nations Choctaw and Chickasaw History / Native American Indians of North America Land titles Law.

The Act, titled “An act for the division of the lands and funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for other purposes,” provides, by section 2, “[t]hat all lands belonging to the Osage tribe shall be divided among the members of said tribe” with.

Act for the Division of Lands and Funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for Other Purposes” and “An Act to Reaffirm the Inherent Sovereign Rights of the Osage Tribe to Determine Its Membership and Form of Government”) THE OSAGE TRIBE OF INDIANS) OF OKLAHOMA,)) Plaintiff,) v.)) THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,)).

The Act of Jentitled, An Act for "the Division of the Lands and Funds of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma Territory, and for Other Purposes," in its ninth section, provided, among other things, for a tribal council composed of eight persons.

THE OCCURRENCE OF OIL AND GAS IN OSAGE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA. INTRODUCTION. Osage, the largest oounty in Oklahoma, is situated a little to the east of the north oentral:part of the state. It oonsists of an area of approximately 2, square miles, or.

about. million and a half acres, ex­ tending from ~. 20 N. to ~. 29 N. and from. Places the property of deceased and incompetent Osage Indians under the jurisdiction of the District Court of Oklahoma.

States that only heirs of Indian blood, adopted children, and parents (regardless of blood) may inherit from Osage Indians any right, title, or interest to (1) restricted land, (2) money, or (3) a mineral interest.

David Grann was already interested in writing a book about the serial murders of members of the Oklahoma-based Osage Indian tribe when he visited the Osage Nation Museum. On one wall was a. Indian Land Laws: Being a Treatise on Indian Land Titles in Oklahoma and Under the General Allotment Act, Amendments and Legislation Supplemental Thereto, Including a Full Consideration of Conveyances of Lands of Minors, Descent, Dower, Curtesy, Taxation, Easements in and Actions Affecting Title to Allotted Indian Lands; Also a Compilation of Treaties, Agreements.

The Osage Nation (/ ˈ oʊ s eɪ dʒ / OH-sayj) (Osage: 𐓁𐓣 𐓂𐓤𐓘𐓯𐓤𐓘͘ (Ni-u-kon-ska), "People of the Middle Waters") is a Midwestern Native American tribe of the Great tribe developed in the Ohio and Mississippi river valleys around BC along with other groups of its language family.

They migrated west of the Mississippi after the 17th century due to wars.By the Act of Congress on 28 June(34 Stat. L., ), the lands of the Osage Nation in what is now Osage County, Oklahoma were divided among the members of the tribe.

Each member received an allotment of acres of surface rights.The Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations has come to the Osage and the federal government is proposing $ million to buy back fractionated land interest from individual tribal members. According to tribal development and land acquisition director Bruce Cass, who is working with Osage attorney.